Tag: character

New book reviews coming soon…

On a Saturday, July 16, 2016, I attended the Soulful Chicago Book fair on Chicago’s south side.  In 2015; Founder, Asadah Kirkland brought over 20 years of experience to create The Soulful Chicago Book Fair . On this beautiful summer afternoon, I had the great pleasure to meet several authors with phenomenal, warm and intense stories to share. We talked about life journeys, family, relationships, being proud to be black, and what it means to grow up in urban communities.

From block to block, authors stood in their booths proudly holding books with confident smiles on their faces. Each block represented a genre of literary work. On the children’s story block, I got a sense of proud parents teaching, learning and sharing powerful stories that will be told for generations. Often times, young adults and children were the authors of the books. It was a proud and humbling experience to witness strong African-American relationships surrounded by books.

Here are a few authors I had the pleasure of meeting and discussing their work:

I Love My Hair by Author, Candace Edwards shares an amazing book that’s fun with phenomenal illustrations by Edward C. Kidd.

Growing up, I didn’t embrace and love my hair as much as Madison. I started to appreciate the beauty and unique qualities of my hair as I got older. I’m thankful Ms. Candace Edwards is sharing this story of confidence.

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Candace Edwards

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Just Because by Author, Chiquita Camille Payne shares a heart-warming story about accepting one another and the importance of family love.

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Chiquita Camille Payne

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sneaky Little K by Author, Sheenita Robinson and Illustrations by Jason Holmes shares an incredible book on discovering phonetics and sounds with the Sneaky Little K.

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Sheenita Robinson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Love of Debbie La’treck” by Author, Habeeba B. Pasha and Illustrations by Pavel Melecky shares an amazing story about a girl name Vivian that has a creative spirit.  She’s an avid reader and loves to live through literary characters. The story and illustrations perfectly flow.

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Habeeba B. Pasha

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Legally Branded, A Memoir by Author Shanna Red is a memoir about Shashanna Wilson. She is a woman who survived a heroin-addicted mother, physical and mental abuse at foster homes that ultimately caused self-identity issues, unhealthy relationships, and education problems. “Legally Branded, A Memoir” takes you on a journey in the shoes of Shashanna as she fights to overcome the darkness of foster care.

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Shanna Red

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Women’s Voices by Author Rebekah S. Cole is an intense story about Jonetta Miller. A young, pregnant and unwanted young lady sent away by her mother to live in Chicago to live with her Aunts. She is faced with tough choices as family tensions rise.

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Rebekah S. Cole

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Call Her by Her Name, Poems by Author Bianca Lynne Spriggs is a book of poetic genius. She tells stories that are rarely told. The book is a celebration of women. It breathes life into the complexity of women.

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Bianca Lynne Spriggs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Let’s read together and start conversations about  amazing authors and important topics!

If you’re an inspiring author, check out the following services:

Books Ink Literary Services has over 40 years of experience helping authors get books from manuscript to the literary marketplace.

Check out the website here:  Books Ink

 Follow Crystal on Twitter @ TousanaC

Lights, Camera, Action- 3 tips to bring out the magic in your next film campaign

Going to the movies is fun. Escaping to the movie theater has always been one of my favorite things to do. In my opinion, life would be boring without witnessing the work of producers, directors, writers, actors, and actresses.

In a March 2007 Ted Talk, J.J. Abrams; a well-known producer and writer, spoke about what inspires him when writing and producing. He says, “There’s an amazing sense of opportunity out there. And when I think of the filmmakers who exist out there now who would have been silenced, you know—who have been silenced in the past—it’s very exciting thing.”

In his talk, J.J. Abrams premise is based on a mystery magic box. He bought the box from a magic store decades ago and never opened it.  The box cost $15 with $50 worth of magic in it.

The magic box represents Mr. Abram beloved grandfather, infinite possibility, hope, and potential. Mystery, as it relates to fiction, is a genre involving something mysterious such as death or a crime to be solved. Each character plays a credible role in making the story move along and keeps the audience engaged. J.J. Abrams says that mystery is more important than knowledge and that it’s a catalyst for imagination. He goes on to say that, “I realize that [that] blank page is a magic box, you know? It needs to be filled with something fantastic.” Overall, he’s suggesting that stories are mystery boxes.

J.J. Abrams is the best at mastering excitement around his work. He has an excellent way of reinforcing brand loyalty by giving followers teasers by revealing the names of characters and presenting teaser trailers. Mr. Abrams is revealing some of the mystery to get a reaction and get people engaging. The trailer for Star Wars broke a record number of 88 million views within 24 hours.

I wholeheartedly believe there’s magic in every story regardless of the genre. As quoted above, there’s always a sense of opportunity. Having the talent to tell a story on a grander scale is attainable provided that there’s some magic in characters and words. Character building is an art form in writers, rather on a larger or smaller scale. What makes the difference is having the ability to carry the story forward in a way that makes the audience excited and want more.

Watch the J.J. Abrams’ Ted Talk here: 

J.J. Abrams Ted Talk

Drawing inspiration from J.J. Abrams, I’d like to offer the following 3 marketing tips:

  1. Create an immersive experience by combining social media with storytelling.
  2. Create audience participation by giving them a say in storyline outcomes.
  3. Give selective releases of information about the characters and story.

 

[Source: The Art of Immersion:  How the digital generation is remaking Hollywood, Madison Avenue, and the way we tell stories, Chapter 7, The Hive and the Mystery Box, Frank Rose]