Don’t let your HUE control your image: 5 great examples of mixing up color with great content.

Living in a world filled with color, it’s important to make your brand stand out.  Color has a way of changing our energy. The brighter the hue, the more energy we have.  The darker the hue, the more somber we become.

Associating color schemes with a product has a way of helping us determine our perception of the brand image. Marketers are tasked with figuring out what makes consumers get excited over a shade of lipstick, time spent in a freshly painted room, a new clothing line that’s runway ready, and many other competing brands looking to stand out.

Imagine breaking through a long journey of product development, go to production, land a deal with a major retailer, and ultimately your first sales hit your books. Days later a similar product line has a launch almost identical but the colors are all the rage. What’s next? Viciously fight for rack space? Or just improve on the next round?

In an Entrepreneur article titled,  The Psychology of Color in Marketing and Branding by Gregory Ciotti, he gives a comprehensive look at the role color plays in marketing. The ultimate goal is to determine the impact color has on customer engagement. The overall premise is that color is a feeling. Focusing on color should be more about what the product represents.

Mr. Ciotti says, It’s the feeling, mood, and image that your brand creates that play a role in persuasion. Be sure to recognize that colors only come into play when they can be used to match a brand’s desired personality (i.e., the use of white to communicate Apple’s love of clean, simple design).

The article speaks extensively to color perceptions. Great article but I personally believe we can get a bit too excited over color schemes and forget to mix it up with better content. 

Here are 5 great examples to consider when working your color scheme:

Check these out:

  1. Headspace Consumers recognize this health and meditation brand by the ORANGE dot but their following is based on awesome content.
  2. Blue Apron Consumers associate the BLUE apron with this super awesome recipe and ingredient service. According to Greg Fitzgerald, Blue Apron’s Director of Acquisition Marketing, the company spent its first few years explaining how the service worked. Now that it has more brand recognition, it’s turned to more in-depth storytelling.
  3. Sun Life Financial uses the brightness of the sun in their name and colors on the website. When talking about money it’s a great idea to connect to a bright future. This insurance giant knows how to turn content into a loyal following and find new followers.
  4. Red Bull You can’t deny RED Bull has the color red locked down for brand image. They successfully connected great content with a brand image that attracts athletes, busy professionals, college students, people taking long journeys, and anyone else ready to fly. Content is king in Red Bull’s story: The Story

My favorite:

  1. “Be Your Beautiful Self.”  Dove has an image of pure and clean. My heart melts whenever I see Dove’s advertisements and commercials . If brand was a human, I’d want to be Dove’s products merely because it represents clean and authentic storytelling told by women we see walking sidewalks every day. These women carry the rainbow in their heart.

I hold this quote from Dove’s website close to my heart:

Beauty is not defined by shape, size or color – it’s feeling like the best version of yourself. Authentic. Unique. Real. Which is why we’ve made sure our site reflects that. Every image you see here features women cast from real life. A real life version of beauty.

Go improve your content, color will follow!

Go to Caramel Lattes and Stilettos to read the pairing to this article!

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